October

National security, or war on workers?

OAKLAND, Calif. – Like many Filipinos living in the San Francisco Bay Area, Erlinda Valencia found a job at the airport, screening carry-on bags for passengers. She worked for Argenbright Security for 14 years, most of that time at a minimum-wage job, barely able to support her family.

Harry Hay, pioneer gay rights activist, mourned

SAN FRANCISCO – Well-known gay rights activist Harry Hay passed away Oct. 17 at the age of 90.

Solidarity is new watchword for actors union

Screen Actors Guild (SAG) President Melissa Gilbert is hoping that stronger ties with the AFL-CIO will help both organizations advance their members’ interests in Washington and help their efforts to take on global conglomerates.

Bowling for ColumbineBowling for Columbine

Movie review Bowling for Columbine

Bridge between two worlds

Review Crescent & Star: Turkey Between Two Worlds, by Stephan Kinzer, published 2001 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 240 pp plus index, hard cover – $25.00, paperback – $14.00

Free trade negotiations only money speaks

Beginning Oct. 12, Mexican citizens have had the opportunity to voice their opinion about the controversial Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). Mexican social organizations are organizing a five-month-long plebiscite, called the “People’s Consultation,” in response to the lack of civil society participation in FTAA negotiations.

Administration hides role in Venezuela coup

Treasury Secretary Paul H. O’Neill’s trip to Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay has brought some needed attention to the financial and economic crises there. But there is one country where the United States is playing an enormous – and thoroughly destructive – role that has been left out of the picture: Venezuela.

New election law carries risks

The passage this October of the “Help America Vote Act” is the product of long and hard work and difficult compromises by members of both the House and Senate, as well as the tireless efforts of election reform advocates around the country. The compromise bill takes historic steps forward, and regrettably, erects barriers at the same time.

One step, millions of steps

If you got on a bus to go to Washington, D.C., for the Oct. 26 antiwar protest, if you took to the streets in San Francisco, or if you took part or plan to take part in a demonstration in any city in the world against the U.S. war against Iraq, you’re in good company. Protest has been the method by which workers have stood together historically to push back the more brutal aims of the ruling class.

Fox hunting trumps activism in major newspapers

In late September, hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of London to protest military action against Iraq, rallying in what the London Independent called “one of the biggest peace demonstrations seen in a generation.” Yet neither The Washington Post nor The New York Times saw fit to run a full article about the protests, instead burying passing mentions of the story in articles about other subjects.

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