Today in labor history: Motley becomes first black woman federal judge

On Aug. 30, 1966, civil rights lawyer Constance Baker Motley became the first African American woman to serve as a federal judge.


Today in labor history: First African-American pilot recognized posthumously

Bullard was rejected by the U.S. Army Air Service because only white pilots were allowed to serve.


Today in labor history: Fisk University incorporated

On Aug. 22, 1867, Fisk University, one of the nation's most famous historically black colleges, was formally incorporated.


Today in labor history: Paul Robeson loses passport appeal

On August 16, 1955, internationally known actor, singer and activist Paul Robeson lost his court appeal to force the U.S. State Department to grant him a passport.


Today in labor history: Power blackout saps Northeast

On this day in 2003, the Northeast of the United States and Canada experienced a massive blackout, which affected 50 million people.


Today in labor history: Seattle Post-Intelligencer strike takes place

The Post-Intelligencer is owned by the Hearst Corporation, which, at the time, was notorious for anti-unionism and anti-communism.


Today in labor history: Mexican leader Emilano Zapata born

Zapata headed the land reform struggles of Mexican farmers and was a leader of the Mexican revolution.


Today in labor history: No more Hiroshimas or Nagasakis

The United States dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, Aug. 9, 1945, three days after the bombing of Hiroshima, the only two cases of using a nuclear weapon against civilians.


Today in labor history: first general strike in Canada held

The first general strike in Canadian history was held in Vancouver on this day in 1918, organized as a 1-day political protest against the killing of draft evader and labor activist Albert "Ginger" Goodwin.