Labor News

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-Standingbear2.jpg

Today in Native History: Court rules an Indian is a man

On May 12 in 1879, Chief Standing Bear of the Ponca tribe was declared a man in the federal courts of the U.S.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-FDR-carves-turkey520x376.jpg

Today in labor history: FDR establishes Thanksgiving holiday

President George Washington became the first president to proclaim a Thanksgiving holiday, when, at the request of Congress, he proclaimed November 26 as a day of national thanksgiving for the U.S. Constitution.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-seminole520x312.jpg

Today in labor history: Seminole Indian resistance came to a head

Conflict carried on until the war ended in August 1842, when the Indians were force-marched to Oklahoma.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-lonewolftheelder.jpg

Today in labor History: First Medicine Lodge Treaty signed

The Medicine Lodge Treaty is the overall name for three treaties signed between the United States government and southern Plains Indian tribes in October 1867.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-diversity3.jpg

As matter of survival, unions double down on diversity

The 50-plus unions of the AFL-CIO redoubled its efforts to diversify its ranks and leadership with more women, workers of color, LGBT and young workers.

assets/Uploads/_resampled/CroppedImage100100-four-homesteaders.jpg

Today in labor history: Homestead Act signed, for good and bad

President Lincoln signed the Homestead Act. It was a freedom opportunity for many, but also resulted in massive displacement of Native Americans.

Labor fights to recognize Native American rights

The AFL-CIO is fighting to add a new constituency group for Native Americans to its roster.