Labor News

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Today in history: first U.S. postage stamps issued, and what that means

On this date in 1847, the Post Office Department (now called the U.S. Postal Service), issued its first two postage stamps.

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After two years of work, Mother Jones monument to be rededicated

Mary Harris "Mother" Jones has been a symbol of the struggles and victories of the labor movement for over a century.

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Today in history: Supreme Court okays sit-down strikes

In 1940, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Apex Hosiery Co. v. Leader that a sit-down strike was not a violation of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act.

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Memorial Day massacre commemoration inspires Midwest steelworkers

Steelworkers and the community gathered to remember the lives lost and lessons learned in the 1937 Memorial Day Massacre.

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Today in history: The 1970 killings at Jackson State College

The Jackson State killings occurred on May 15, 1970, at Jackson State College, a historically Black college.

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Today in labor history: “The Song of the Wage-Slave” for May Day

"The land is the landlord's, the trader's is the sea, the ore the usurer's coffer fills - but what remains for me?"

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Today in labor history: The 1968 Memphis sanitation strike ends

On this date in 1968, the Memphis Sanitation Strike came to an end.

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Today in history: Feminist labor organizer Rose Schneiderman is born

A fiery labor orator,  feminist and socialist, she served as president of the Women's Trade Union League.

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Today in women’s and labor history: Triangle sweatshop fire kills 146

A total of 146 workers - almost all of them immigrant women - were killed in a fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory.

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Today in women’s and labor history: Teachers unite in NYC

The United Federation of Teachers was formed to represent New York City public school teachers on March 16, 1960.

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