Labor News


Today in labor history: Attica prison uprising ends

Today in labor history in 1971, 11 AFSCME-represented prison employees and 33 inmates died after an uprising at Attica Correctional Facility in New York State and its subsequent bloody end with 1,000 police and national guard troops seizing the prison.


Today in labor history: W.E.B. Du Bois dies in Ghana

On this day in 1963 on the eve of the historic March on Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois died in Ghana.


Today in labor history: D.C. restaurants integrate

It was on June 8, 1953 that the tide turned in favor of racial equality, and the prejudicial policies of Washington restaurants were expressly forbidden.


Jobs pipeline offers hope

Youth, the unemployed, elected officials, educators, union leaders, and the business community were all represented at a public hearing.


Amid racism and shootings, labor fights back

A series of shootings in Tulsa's Greenwood area has once again raised concerns over escalating racial tensions.


Unions take aim at discrimination against Latinas

"For Latinas, the pathway to social and economic advancement is lined with hurdles," says the 134-page Trabajadoras: Challenges and Conditions of Latina Workers in the United States.


NAACP rallies for grocery workers, labor rights

Hundreds of delegates to the NAACP's 102nd convention marched in support of UFCW, which is in negotiations with supermarket companies.


America’s new sweatshop: warehouse work

A new report paints a picture of exploitation of a mostly minority labor force in the logistics field.


Labor takes on racism in GOP "Pledge"

The Republican Party's platform for the mid-term elections, its "Pledge to America," has a sharply racist edge.

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