Today in women's history: Three Mile Island nuclear reactor overheats

Jimmy carter at three mile450x450

From history.com: The most serious nuclear accident in United States history takes place at the Three Mile Island plant near Harrisburg, Pa., March 28, 1979, when one of the reactors overheats. Fortunately, a catastrophic meltdown was averted and there were no deaths or direct injuries from the accident. But the radiation levels went up and Pennsylvania Governor Richard Thornburgh directed that pregnant women and small children be evacuated from the area.

The Three Mile Island plant had begun operations just months earlier on December 28, 1978. Very shortly after operations began, problems arose. It was 3:58 a.m. on March 28 when a pump that directed steam to the plant's electric turbines stopped working, causing a water circulation pump to break down. Without the water, the temperature of the reactor rose dramatically and a relief valve opened to stop the pressure from building to dangerous levels. Unfortunately, the valve then would not close.

The plant operators, with no experience in emergencies, made key errors. Another valve was opened to allow water from the nuclear system into a waste tank. But this water ruptured the tank and radioactive water flooded into the reactor. Even worse, an operator shut off the automatic core-cooling system. The result of all these events and mistakes was that radioactive steam poured out of the plant. Additionally, radioactive water had to be released into the Susquehanna River. However, area authorities were not notified of these events until nearly three hours later.

Even when news of the accident was released, it was downplayed. But within days, radiation levels were elevated over a four-county area. Furthermore, the plant's operators were still trying to get the situation under control. That's when Gov. Thornburgh ordered the evacuation of pregnant women and small children. Finally, on March 31, plant workers were able to address the problems and ended the threat of a meltdown. The area was deemed safe on April 9.

A subsequent investigation and report blamed a combination of human error and faulty design for the accident. In March 1984, the Metropolitan Edison Company pleaded guilty to knowingly using inaccurate test methods at the plant before the incident. The Three Mile Island accident also exposed the lack of an appropriate evacuation plan for the area.

In the years following this accident, there has been an ongoing controversy over whether the increased radiation released at Three Mile Island led to an increase of cancer and infant mortality in the surrounding areas.

Photo: President Jimmy Carter tours the Three Mile Island-2 control room with (l to r) Harold Denton, Governor Dick Thornburgh and James Floyd, supervisor of TMI-2 operations, on April 1. (Wikipedia)

 

Post your comment

Comments are moderated. See guidelines here.

Comments

  • Um...you do realize this has absolutely nothing to do with women's history, right? Instead of pretending an environmental story is about women's history, why don't you find an actual women's history story to commemorate?

    Posted by Jack Carter, 03/28/2014 3:30pm (4 months ago)

RSS feed for comments on this page | RSS feed for all comments