Eisenberg, Humane Society on mistreatment of exotic birds

littleparrot

Actor Jesse Eisenberg, working with the Humane Society, has made an important statement about birds: Each year, about 25,000 of them are smuggled into the U.S. The exotic pet trade is a blossoming, corrupt business that inadvertently creates a large percentage of mistreated parrots, as well as those that are left behind, where overwhelmed rescue groups and animal shelters must deal with them.

"If an animal's natural home is in the wild," said Eisenberg, "then chances are that's where it belongs." Eisenberg, who played the voice of the blue macaw in the animated film Rio, is fronting the Humane Society's campaign to save exotic birds and raise awareness on animal cruelty.

The growing demand for parrots fuels the exotic pet trade and results in the displacement of these and similar birds throughout the U.S., said a press release by the Humane Society.

Eisenberg, best known for playing the role of Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network, added, "Unfortunately, the demand for these intelligent, complex creatures - whether captive-bred or wild-caught - is decimating the wild parrot species."

With the backing of Eisenberg, who has recently been vocal for animal rights, the Humane Society is clearly looking to ruffle a few feathers on those responsible for animal neglect or cruelty. It would seem like an important time to do so, considering the fact that Eisenberg's announcement comes just a month and a half after the Humane Society of Greater Dayton rescued over 100 parrots and other birds from unlivable conditions in Moraine, Ohio.

"Wings Over the Rainbow" was supposedly a bird sanctuary there, but the Humane Society's Animal Rescue Team - as well as other animal rights organizations - discovered that the birds were actually living in a deplorable environment. The animals were suffering from severe stress, malnutrition, dehydration, and diseases. Notably, this is not the first time that a place masquerading as an animal sanctuary was, upon investigation, revealed to be anything but.

The birds are now being cared for at a shelter, but the point that Eisenberg seems to make is that something needs to be done to combat the exotic pet trade before problems like this develop.

In order to take steps toward solving the problem, Eisenberg advised that people think twice before purchasing parrots as pets, as this entails a serious commitment. He also encouraged activists to support local bird rescues or shelters, and choose not to support the $20 billion exotic animal trade.

Every day, people smuggle live animals into the U.S.; it has become a lucrative criminal enterprise that is becoming increasingly difficult to stop, and many pet owners contribute to it unknowingly. Eisenberg warned that people interested in parrots should not purchase the animals online, nor should they blindly buy them from pet stores without being aware of the background and details.

According to Adam Roberts, an exotic animals expert with Born Free USA (an animal advocacy group), when pet owners recklessly release their birds or other animals into the wild, they become a problem for other people.

"People get attacked by the animals; the animals themselves get hurt," Roberts remarked. "Oftentimes, they are released when people can no longer care for them, which is threatening to domestic wildlife and people. It's very dangerous across the board. We hope to dissuade people from getting these animals in the first place."

Adam Parascandola, director of the Humane Society's animal cruelty investigation, concluded, "We're grateful to Jesse Eisenberg for helping us raise awareness of the growing problem of unwanted captive birds in the country.

"Parrots are highly intelligent, social, and long-lived animals whose complex needs cannot be met by most owners, which is why so many are abandoned" in the first place.

Photo: Wikipedia

Post your comment

Comments are moderated. See guidelines here.

Comments

  • I do not agree with the above article. I do not think that this site will allow my opinions, but here they are:

    It is nice to make comments like this about ownership of parrots now and "future" parrots as pets, but what about the parrots out there now? Mr. Eisenberg is not a parrot expert and knows nothing about owning a parrot, breeding one, what happens when people get tired of their parrot or what a bird rescue's process is when they accept an unwanted parrot.

    Every rescue organization will have parrots in bad feather condition. One must know "parrots" to understand why....

    Parrots live a long time. The public has a right to own pets. No, you cannot ship domesticated parrots back to the jungles. They will die. They cannot fend for themselves. They are bred to be pets. Unwanted older parrots do not deserve to be euthanized either. Only a lazy pet owner, Animal Control, or the Humane Society will consider this option.

    A parrot rescue organization will take unwanted parrots in to find them new homes. That is what Wings did, take parrots in. Birds in bad feather condition are harder to place so those parrots are there for a while.

    The parrots in bad feather condition were obtained IN THAT BAD FEATHER CONDITION. Wings should have paperwork in their files as proof. They did not abuse those birds. The birds most probably were self-mutilators that were unhappy in one of their past homes. (there is no such thing as a"forever home" when it comes to long-lived parrots) Also baby parrots are picked in the nest by their parents, and picking feathers of another bird is common among pairs of birds. Those feathers are used to line their nests! A mature parrot, pet or not, will go thru this picking mode sometimes. And sometimes feather follicles are permanently damaged where the feathers will never come back also. Parrot Care 101...

    This is a case of the Parrot Mafia trying to use Wings as an example to get all other rescue organizations to fold up, get rid of our pets and rescue birds, and encourage the euthanization of all of the unwanted birds that people need to find homes for in the future.

    In my opinion animal abuse is "A human knowlingly harming an animal for a human's amusement, fun, or in retaliation for a parrot biting the human". Rescues do not abuse.

    Also, Wings' birds were not diseased. This is a fabrication by the Humane Society. Exactly what DISEASES did those birds have??? Does the Humane Society know what bird DISEASES are out there in the first place?

    The Humane Society "rescues" cats and dogs and now has got the publicity pictures they need to post sad pictures of parrots in their commercials. What a feather in the Humane Society's cap! What a perfect time to beg for donations for the HS also!

    It is unfair to have descended on Wings in Ohio the way they did. Personally I turn off those sick commercials of hurt animals FAST when they come on at nite. Since I so dislike those commercials, my donations go elsewhere.

    This is the other side of the rescue story....

    I wish Wings the best of luck in getting their rescue birds back.

    An Ohio Bird Owner

    Posted by Georgia N., 07/23/2012 12:53am (2 years ago)

  • I do not agree with the above article. I do not think that this site will allow my opinions, but here they are:

    It is nice to make comments like this about ownership of parrots now and "future" parrots as pets, but what about the parrots out there now? Mr. Eisenberg is not a parrot expert and knows nothing about owning a parrot, breeding one, what happens when people get tired of their parrot or what a bird rescue's process is when they accept an unwanted parrot.

    Every rescue organization will have parrots in bad feather condition. One must know "parrots" to understand why....

    Parrots live a long time. The public has a right to own pets. No, you cannot ship domesticated parrots back to the jungles. They will die. They cannot fend for themselves. They are bred to be pets. Unwanted older parrots do not deserve to be euthanized either. Only a lazy pet owner, Animal Control, or the Humane Society will consider this option.

    A parrot rescue organization will take unwanted parrots in to find them new homes. That is what Wings did, take parrots in. Birds in bad feather condition are harder to place so those parrots are there for a while.

    The parrots in bad feather condition were obtained IN THAT BAD FEATHER CONDITION. Wings should have paperwork in their files as proof. They did not abuse those birds. The birds most probably were self-mutilators that were unhappy in one of their past homes. (there is no such thing as a"forever home" when it comes to long-lived parrots) Also baby parrots are picked in the nest by their parents, and picking feathers of another bird is common among pairs of birds. Those feathers are used to line their nests! A mature parrot, pet or not, will go thru this picking mode sometimes. And sometimes feather follicles are permanently damaged where the feathers will never come back also. Parrot Care 101...

    This is a case of the Parrot Mafia trying to use Wings as an example to get all other rescue organizations to fold up, get rid of our pets and rescue birds, and encourage the euthanization of all of the unwanted birds that people need to find homes for in the future.

    In my opinion animal abuse is "A human knowlingly harming an animal for a human's amusement, fun, or in retaliation for a parrot biting the human". Rescues do not abuse.

    Also, Wings' birds were not diseased. This is a fabrication by the Humane Society. Exactly what DISEASES did those birds have??? Does the Humane Society know what bird DISEASES are out there in the first place?

    The Humane Society "rescues" cats and dogs and now has got the publicity pictures they need to post sad pictures of parrots in their commercials. What a feather in the Humane Society's cap! What a perfect time to beg for donations for the HS also!

    It is unfair to have descended on Wings in Ohio the way they did. Personally I turn off those sick commercials of hurt animals FAST when they come on at nite. Since I so dislike those commercials, my donations go elsewhere.

    This is the other side of the rescue story....

    I wish Wings the best of luck in getting their rescue birds back.

    An Ohio Bird Owner


    Posted by Georgia N., 07/23/2012 12:51am (2 years ago)

  • Thanks for this excellent article. I suspect that irate commenter Laura is probably connected to the bird "industry." For an excellent movie about abandoned parrots, see "Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill."

    Posted by Jackie Jones, 07/16/2012 4:46pm (2 years ago)

  • Before taking Larella Desborough's comments too seriously people should note she represents the National Animal Interest Alliance which Wikepedia describes as follows:"NAIA receives its primary financial support from donations from individuals, the majority of whom are pet owners who support the goals of NAIA, related businesses and associations in farm animal agribusiness, commercial breeding, hunting, fishing, trapping, fur ranching, animal research, rodeos and circuses. In other words, all the traditional animal interests." If you read the whole article in Wikepedia you will find the Ms. Desborough and the NAIA are fronting for the businesses that make their money out of animal expolitation. Indeed, her attack on the Humane Society is typical. I don't know how many birds are smuggled into the US but I would not trust the NAIA to be on the right side of any animal welfare legislation.

    Posted by Thomas Riggins, 07/16/2012 1:59pm (2 years ago)

  • Blake Deppe, you should have asked this Jesse person where he came up with his numbers...because they are totally wrong...maybe 30 years old at best. This kind of bad information should not be published by any professional journalist. Just repeating what Jesse said does not make for any factual information. Especially when the USFWS reports that LESS THAN ONE HUNDRED birds a year are likely smuggled into the US.

    So, this is a propaganda piece, likely orchestrated by the HSUS and poor Jesse is a willing participant in putting forward bad information.

    I don't expect to see this comment displayed, since my previous comment was not displayed, but perhaps you, Blake, will read it and know that the thousands of people who know something about smuggling, the USFWS, and birds do not believe a word that Jesse has said. Very sad to see entertainment persons used to further the propaganda of the HSUS.

    Posted by Laurella Desborough, 07/14/2012 2:55pm (2 years ago)

  • It is a shame that someone with a high profile would publish total nonsense...25,000 birds are smuggled into the US each year. Even the USFWS says that smuggling is now a NON-ISSUE due to the fact there is so little going on. Most smuggling is actually done by families entering the country from Mexico and bringing along their family pet budgie, conure or amazon, perhaps not realizing that they need special documents to bring the birds along. Smuggling birds is a thing of the past when we have the availability of healthy well socialized birds that are bred and raised in the US.

    Raising awareness is one thing...presenting totally fabricated numbers is another thing. So, who handed Jesse Eisenberg that data? It surely wasn't a reliable source! Too bad Jesse didn't check out the numbers before making himself look foolish to all who are knowledgeable about birds in the USA.

    However, it does fit the agenda of the HSUS, working to eliminate ALL pets, but working on exotics right now, and using a lot of total misinformation to do so. I expect one day to see the HSUS proposing making ownership of birds illegal...in spite of the fact that the great majority of birds in the US are DOMESTIC BRED and RAISED right here in the USA by experienced professionals who are responsible bird keepers and breeders, fulfilling the mandate of the Wild Bird Conservation Act passed by Congress in 1992!

    Posted by Laurella Desborough, 07/13/2012 11:49pm (2 years ago)

RSS feed for comments on this page | RSS feed for all comments