Labor News

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Today in labor history: Medicare and Medicaid established

The ongoing fight to protect Medicare and Medicaid today from right-wing "reforms" is in sharp contrast to the victory of July 30, 1965.

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Today in Labor History: The Alliance for Labor Action forms

This national trade union center organized unorganized workers and pursued progressive political and social projects.

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Today in labor history: Pullman strike leader murder sparks huge protest funeral

During the Pullman strike, Charles Leonard, a representative of Omaha Railway murdered Charles Luth, a railroad switchman and union activist.

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Breaking the myth of "un-organizable" workers

Labor must organize the three pillars of workers: low wage workers, professional and highly skilled workers and workers internationally cross-border.

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Yuengling Brewery billionaire pushes "right-to-work" in my home county

Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, where I grew up, is famous for two things: anthracite coal and union organizing.

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Today in labor history: Hawaii longshoremen strike

Hawaiian workers who were members of the ILWU went on strike, seeking higher pay to match that of longshoremen on the West Coast U.S.

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Today in labor history: Blues legend Big Bill Broonzy born

Lee Conley Bradley, who became known as Big Bill Broonzy, was born on June 26 in 1893, as he later said, or possibly in 1905 as family records suggest.

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Today in labor history: Fair Labor Standards Act signed by Roosevelt

Senator Hugo Black,  author of the law, initially proposed a 30-hour week. Close to 700,000 workers were benefited from the legislation.

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Today in labor history: Title IX enacted

Title IX prohibits federally funded educational institutions from discriminating against students or employees based on sex.

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Today in labor history: The 1937 “Women’s Day Massacre”

On June 19, 1937, police in Youngstown, Ohio, used tear gas on women and children, including at least one infant in his mother's arms, during the historic strike at Republic Steel.

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